Citation Rates

Citation indicators used in the Web of Science:
  • Impact factor - impact of the journal calculated based on the Web of Science database. Specifies the number of received citations / number of articles for the previous two years.
  • Eigenfactor Score - the degree of importance of the journal for the scientific community.
    Estimates the percentage of time that users spend with that journal.
    Score increases with the size of the journal, directly depends on the number of articles - larger journals also have a higher ES. The sum of the ES for all journals is equal to 100; each journal is attributed a proportional part out of 100.
Citation indicators used in the Scopus database:
  • CiteScore - transparently calculated impact of the journal calculated based on the Web of Science database.
    Specifies the number of received citations / number of articles for the previous two years.
  • SJR (SCImago Journal Rank)
    SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) reflects the prestige or status of the citing source: the value represents weighted citations per document.
  • SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper)
    Source-Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) corrects for differences in the frequency of citation across research fields.
  • IPP (Impact Per Publication)
    Like the journal impact factor, IPP does not correct for differences in citation practices between scientific fields. Previously known as RIP (Raw Impact per Publication).
Citation rates for individual authors:

If you want to find out about your publication activities and citation rate, it is necessary to use the following citation registers:

Parallel search in both these databases (and many others) is possible through Xerxes – the TBU Library information portal.

The Hirsch index (h-index) is an index that attempts to measure both the productivity and impact of the published work of an individual scientist or of a group of authors. The index is based on the set of the scientist's most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications and is available in the Web of Science and Scopus databases. The H-index equals to the serial number of the relevant publication whose number of citations is the same or higher than its serial number. 

Practical example:

  • Article A - 15 citations
  • Article B - 10 citations
  • Article C - 5 citations
  • Article D - 4 citations
  • The h-index has a value of 4 = 4 articles by the relevant author have been cited at least 4x.